Writing Session Essentials – Part 1

1

Comfy desk chair

Take time to find one you really like since your ass is going to be sitting in it for a long time

2

Cup of Joe

Obviously. You’ll need a few of these. Make sure you also drink the same amount of water so you won’t feel run down and strung out… But in the same breath, Stephen King claims to have been so coked up he doesn’t even remember writing Cujo. So go figure.

3

Speedy laser printer

Having one of these will save you the agitation of having to replace your inkjet printer every time it runs out of ink. Why buy cartridges when you can get a whole new machine for the same price?
We use the Brother laser printer HL-L2360DW.
Here’s a great article on printers.

4

Peace & Quiet

Make sure your writing time is free from distractions. Put your cell phones on airplane mode and ask those you live with not to interrupt your writing session. You’ll have to ask this a couple of times before they get it, bothering working writers is a pastime for some.

5

Fuzzy companion

Keep your pets close by so you can glance at them napping or pet them on your lap. Your fuzzy companions are your biggest supporters and having their energy nearby is very soothing. It’s also better than having them claw or scratch at your office door.

Sourpuss at Book Soup

You can find Sourpuss at:

BookSoup
8818 Sunset Blvd
West Hollywood, CA 90069

Book Soup is an independent bookstore in LA – It offers a place for bibliophiles to find popular and unique reads. Pop in and check out the goods and do say hello to our Sourpuss.

The Hammer: Winter Exhibitions Opening Celebration

Last night was the Winter Exhibitions Opening Celebration at the Hammer Museum. It’s a super fun event that’s free! We saw old men with massive beards and cool ass jackets, the Hammer staffers and UCLA students ripping up the dance floor, and cruised through the galleries.

If you are looking for something to do in Los Angeles, visit the Hammer admission is always free and open to the public!

We tasted The Audrey (tequila, passionfruit, cinnamon, jalapeno, lime, agave, smoked salt) and The Dear Rosemary (vodka, sake, spiced pear, lemon, rosemary, topped with soda) from the pop-up bar in the courtyard.

On Comedy In Writing

Comedy in writing is incredibly difficult. Mostly because what each particular person finds funny is personal. There were times when we thought about holding back or changing something we thought was funny to make it more palatable to a wider group of people. But then we didn’t think it was funny. It was just lame it was no longer accurate. It didn’t tell our truth. So we decided we could only be ourselves and if we thought it was funny then that was good enough. That’s the key.

It didn’t tell our truth.

Everything is not for everybody and that’s perfectly fine. We can’t tell you how many times we’ve laughed hysterically while relaying a story only to be met with wide eyes. But other people laugh along just as hard. Perhaps that’s because what we find funny is based on truth and sometimes the truth is absolutely horrible. How true something is, is directly related to how funny we think it is, no matter how wrong it is.

Maison Assouline: Holiday Visit 2018

We recently visited Maison Assouline in London, the crème del a crème of luxury bookstores. For writers, authors and book lovers it’s a great wonder of the world, for anybody else it’s like Harrod’s with books. However, Assouline proudly proclaims it’s so much more.

“Beyond “beautiful books” Assouline is invested in the promotion of culture. It has created the “first brand of luxury culture” by opening boutiques where one can discover a world of good taste, excitement and intellect, a place where “culture can be acquired” within a luxurious environment. One can purchase complete book collections as well as objects that belong in contemporary libraries such as perfumed candles and “cabinets of curiosities.” {source}
If you visit, be sure to made reservations at Swans bar beforehand. It’s loaded with literary types so it’s a great place to eavesdrop and meet new people. You could become privy to who just landed the biggest book deal of the year before it goes public (or even better) have three cocktails with a mysterious new friend.
“Our digital world goes faster than ever and nothing remains of it, but books are the solid part of our past and present. They also are beauty. For us, books are a matter of intellect and emotion, of heritage and innovation. Because information is not only about today, and the past is a sensational
source of inspiration.” – Prosper & Martine Assouline {source}

We found spaces arranged, their only purpose to celebrate beauty and art.

 

For more info visit “https://www.assouline.com
And check out the article Maison Assouline: London’s Luxury Shop For Bibliophiles

 

Our First Sourpuss Reviews:

What Writing Sourpuss Taught Us – Part 2

We are nearing the release of Sourpuss (January 20, 2019) and early reviews are coming in. 
Here are some of our favorites so far.

 

    

 

And for other new authors, if you receive a review that you feel is unfair or unkind, remember what Anton Ego (the food critic from Ratatouille) had to say.

 
In many ways, the work of a critic is easy. We risk very little yet enjoy a position over those who offer up their work and their selves to our judgment. We thrive on negative criticism, which is fun to write and to read. But the bitter truth we critics must face, is that in the grand scheme of things, the average piece of junk is probably more meaningful than our criticism designating it so. But there are times when a critic truly risks something, and that is in the discovery and defense of the new. The world is often unkind to new talent, new creations, the new needs friends.
 
Anton Ego
Ratatouille

What To Do Before You Start Your First Novel:

What Writing Sourpuss Taught Us - Part 1

Inspiration struck you and now you’ve decided to write your first book. But, where do you start? Maybe you think you should just start writing. Or do you plot everything first? It will take time to figure out what method works best for you, so in the meantime make sure you…

1

Love your premise

Your novel might take years to finish which means your unique story idea should continually inspire you, call to you, and keep you up at night. There will be more days when you’d rather go to the beach, have drinks with friends, stare at the wall or even clean the cat box before you type another word. But, if you’re in love with your story you’ll continually find the discipline to come back to it.

2

Remove doubt

If there are a million questions flying through your mind find the answers. They could be about your story, what writing software to use, or even when you’ll have the time to write. Get to the bottom of a healthy amount of them otherwise they’ll start masquerading as concerns. You don’t want to find yourself filled with excuses as to why you can’t go on.

3

Join a writers’ group

We found ourselves in a writers’ group when we first started our novel. At first, we were too cool and convinced somebody would steal our genius and unique ideas. However, we ended up meeting the most joyous group of people who loved to read and talk about books. Jessica Brody came and taught a class based on Blake Snyder’s Save The Cat! which really helped us get our shit together as writers. Ultimately we were exposed to that and other resources we could have missed out on.

4

Compile your Resources

While researching save articles and handouts, keep your notes organized, bookmark those blogs, highlight book passages. Keep everything neat and easily accessible. (Don’t let your beloved pets nest in your research materials.) You won’t need those immediately, but you’ll need them once you’re stuck in your second act and you remember reading something somewhere that could help.

5

Start a new hobby

From time to time, you’ll need something to take your mind completely away from your story. When you apply yourself to something new you won’t be able to think about writing. Plus you’ll have something fun to do when you get a deserved break from all that discipline. Try something social or a skill you always wanted to learn. That way by the time you finish your novel you’ll also be an accomplished falconer.

Welcome to the world of Merricat Mulwray

On a spring afternoon too many years ago, the two of us were hanging out. One of us was spending her day off tending to her apartment, while the other followed behind sharing an idea for a story. It was only after it was made clear that there wouldn’t be any listening, unless the other sister joined in the swiffering, that the ideas began rolling. As the dusting slowed, we found ourselves in our first writers’ session. It was all shits and giggles as we toyed with the premise and named characters. Alas, the fate of poor Steve.

We were so naïve
about the task…

Before we parted: there was a pause. We looked at each other. “Should we write it together?”

We so were naïve about the task…

As our writing sessions progressed, we realized it wasn’t going to be all good times. (We’ll save explaining the great labor of writing a novel for another post.) We carried on and turned our back on portions of our lives, setting out to tell our story in a manner that was true to both our voices.

Along the way we found a common perspective via a few sisterly fights.  As our worldviews came into alignment, our sense of humor became sharper and our relationship deeper. . .

How we didn’t end up in a modern version of What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, with an unfinished novel, is beyond us. But we made it without serving each other our pets.

We are excited to announce the release of our novel, Sourpuss.
And encourage you to stay and enjoy the rest of the things we have to share.